Quit drugs campaigns have not cut supply chains in Villupuram – The New Indian Express

Express press service

VILLUPURAM: The state government and district administration had launched an anti-drug awareness campaign earlier this month which involved swearing-in ceremonies, human chain gatherings, musical gatherings and the distribution of leaflets in the schools and colleges.

The election campaign involved more than 20,000 students who took part in various events, according to official sources. But the big questions remain unanswered: Has the message really reached those who need it, and will such campaigns ever help young people get off drugs?

According to the district police, in the past three months alone, five minors have been arrested in drug abuse cases in Villupuram. Apart from this, 17 cases of sale/consumption/hawking of ganja and 60 cases of gutkha were recorded. Data shows the district reports one such case every 28 hours, with 77 cases recorded in 90 days. In this reality, campaign strategies really seem to be lagging behind in having an impact.

“Does the government really think that by advising against drugs or by publishing citations against drugs, you can stop a young boy from using them? The reality is no, and we can all agree. Increasing policing and finding innovative policing methods to track sellers can only have a real impact. But the government almost never reveals anything on this front,” said U Karkee, secretary of an NGO that works with rural students on education and employment.

Karkee further said that in working with over 1,000 young people over the last 13 years of his service, drug addicts were the most critical to deal with because despite their jobs they would not take it and instead return to their homes. friends for drugs.

Speaking on the issue, District Police Superintendent N Sreenatha told TNIE, “It is a serious problem and the police are adopting various strategies to bring it under control. First, we try to identify sources/peddlers in the neighborhood. Investigation revealed that there is no drug gang operating in the district but individual fringe members. The SP said these members travel to Chennai or Tiruvannamalai to obtain large quantities of ganja and similar substances and then sell them back to Villupuram at market price.

When TNIE interacted with a few students who claimed to have used drugs, it was apparent that the marketing chain was still intact. A 16-year-old boy from Villupuram town said, “We get the materials from various sources, including children, and take them to secluded places in the town like the abandoned railway settlement or the railway track at the gate of Katpadi.

We met early in the morning and late at night and no police came to inspect us. Sometimes even the cops are afraid to mess with the people behind the drug trade here. Another youth confessed that despite the campaign, the availability of the substances has not diminished one bit and that these efforts have had little impact on the drug market.

Suggesting alternatives to the countryside, a major and repeated suggestion from a group of 15 young people from across the city was to revive neighborhood playgrounds with adequate security so peddlers couldn’t get their hands on the boys. . In addition, they also demanded that regular sporting events be organized by the government as well as the establishment of libraries or event centers that can pave the way for creative pursuits like music, art and others before them. The District Collector responded to the question saying that serious and ongoing interaction on the matter will take place and the required changes will be made soon.

VILLUPURAM: The state government and district administration had launched an anti-drug awareness campaign earlier this month which involved swearing-in ceremonies, human chain gatherings, musical gatherings and the distribution of leaflets in the schools and colleges. The election campaign involved more than 20,000 students who took part in various events, according to official sources. But the big questions remain unanswered: Has the message really reached those who need it, and will such campaigns ever help young people get off drugs? According to the district police, in the past three months alone, five minors have been arrested in drug abuse cases in Villupuram. Apart from this, 17 cases of sale/consumption/hawking of ganja and 60 cases of gutkha were recorded. Data shows the district reports one such case every 28 hours, with 77 cases recorded in 90 days. In this reality, campaign strategies really seem to be lagging behind in having an impact. “Does the government really think that by advising against drugs or by publishing citations against drugs, you can stop a young boy from using them? The reality is no, and we can all agree. Increasing policing and finding innovative policing methods to track sellers can only have a real impact. But the government almost never reveals anything on this front,” said U Karkee, secretary of an NGO that works with rural students on education and employment. Karkee further said that in working with over 1,000 young people over the last 13 years of his service, drug addicts were the most critical to deal with because despite their jobs they would not take it and instead return to their homes. friends for drugs. Speaking on the issue, District Police Superintendent N Sreenatha told TNIE, “It is a serious problem and the police are adopting various strategies to bring it under control. First, we try to identify sources/peddlers in the neighborhood. Investigation revealed that there is no drug gang operating in the district but individual fringe members. The SP said these members travel to Chennai or Tiruvannamalai to obtain large quantities of ganja and similar substances and then sell them back to Villupuram at market price. When TNIE interacted with a few students who claimed to have used drugs, it was apparent that the marketing chain was still intact. A 16-year-old boy from Villupuram town said, “We get the materials from various sources, including children, and take them to secluded places in the town like the abandoned railway settlement or the railway track at the gate of Katpadi. We met early in the morning and late at night and no police came to inspect us. Sometimes even the cops are afraid to mess with the people behind the drug trade here. Another youth confessed that despite the campaign, the availability of the substances has not diminished one bit and that these efforts have had little impact on the drug market. Suggesting alternatives to the countryside, a major and repeated suggestion from a group of 15 young people from across the city was to revive neighborhood playgrounds with adequate security so peddlers couldn’t get their hands on the boys. . In addition, they also demanded that regular sporting events be organized by the government as well as the establishment of libraries or event centers that can pave the way for creative pursuits like music, art and others before them. The District Collector responded to the question by saying that serious and ongoing interaction on the matter will take place and the required changes will be made soon.

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