instrumental music – U One Music http://u-one-music.com/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 11:28:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://u-one-music.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png instrumental music – U One Music http://u-one-music.com/ 32 32 Corn Potato String Band performs at The Ark https://u-one-music.com/corn-potato-string-band-performs-at-the-ark/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 14:30:59 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/corn-potato-string-band-performs-at-the-ark/ Aaron Jonah Lewis, Lindsay McCaw and Ben Belcher. (Maize Potato String Group) When planning the next tour, the members of Corn Potato will include visuals designed and crafted by Lindsay McCaw. The three members of the Corn Potato String Band started playing fun country music together in 2012, but it’s been almost three years since […]]]>
Aaron Jonah Lewis, Lindsay McCaw and Ben Belcher. (Maize Potato String Group)

When planning the next tour, the members of Corn Potato will include visuals designed and crafted by Lindsay McCaw.

The three members of the Corn Potato String Band started playing fun country music together in 2012, but it’s been almost three years since they’ve been able to perform in person as a trio.

With entertainment venues reopening, they’re happy to return to their Michigan songwriting styles with an appearance on Thursday, Feb. 10 at The Ark in Ann Arbor.

Feeling their energy brewing, the three dubbed it the “No Spaghetti Arms Tour”.

“The main way I’ve felt liberated since the pandemic is setting aside time to play music with my really good friends,” said Detroiter Aaron Jonah Lewis, a multi-instrumentalist joined by fellow Detroiter and multi-instrumentalist , Lindsay McCaw, and banjo player Ben Belcher from Alabama.

“Being in front of people and sharing this experience has always been very important to us, and it was hard to live without it.”

Instruments played by the trio include violin, guitar, bass and mandolin. They joke about what their title represents about themselves and their choice of songs: the ears and eyes of America like the starches of the New World.

“We do traditional songs, new songs and tell the stories that come with the songwriting,” said Lewis, a Midwestern artist whose immersion in Southern music came after classical. “We try to make songs that people will recognize and identify with as well as songs that they’ve never heard before. One idea is to unearth gems from the musical past.

An example of their style is the presentation of two versions of a tune based on the Washington and Lee University fight song in Lexington, Virginia. Lewis makes “Washington County” learned as a fiddle arrangement once recorded by famed fiddler Kenny Baker. McCaw does “Washington and Lee Swing”, a jazz version performed at the beginning by Louis Armstrong.

“We like to revel in history and the connection to the past, but we also really like entertainment and humor,” explained Lewis, whose group has appeared in the United States and abroad. “It’s funny how we’ll find a song that was played by some sort of hillbilly string band in the 20s and 30s, and it turns out it was written by professional songwriters on Tin Pan Alley years earlier.

Lewis, 40, who also teaches instrumental music to private students, studied violin in Interlochen before being introduced to folk styles and country artists by a friend he met through a Habonim Dror program in Israel.

After working with different bands and getting to know different musicians, Lewis asked Belcher and McGaw to form Corn Potato. He had met Belcher through connections made during the program in Israel, and he got to know McGaw through his attendance at an Appalachian String Band Festival in West Virginia.

“We’re kind of like a niche of a niche,” Lewis said. “We best correspond to what people call the country of old. We don’t sound quite like the others. Although we consider it country music, it is bolder country music. It covers the period prior to the availability of registered technology.

“We’re not trying to play what people have heard 1,000 times. It’s a bit of education. We try to share things they may not have heard before and tell the context.

During the pandemic, Lewis began working on a record, “Ragtime Banjo Revival,” independent of his partners at Corn Potato. It will have 27 pieces arranged for banjo and other instruments and will feature 10 different sets across the selections.

The numbers range from “Maple Leaf Rag” popularized by Scott Joplin to “Pearl of the Harem” by Harry Guy, a 100-year-old Detroit songwriter who loves ragtime.

When planning the next tour, the members of Corn Potato will include visuals designed and manufactured by McCaw. Moved like a scroll mounted on a few rods to make up what is known as a grumpy show, the images – abstract and figurative – will scroll to accentuate the music.

Two songs with accompanying images are Emile Grimshaw’s “You and a Canoe” and Joe Morley’s “Freckles”, which features on Lewis’ last recording, Banjo Mozart: The Joe Morley Project.

The audience participates by imagining for themselves how the images relate.

Details

The Corn Potato String Band will appear at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 10 at The Ark, 316 S. Main Street, Ann Arbor. $20. (734) 761-1800. theark.org. For more information on group and tour updates, go to cornpotato.com.

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Joël’s favorite instrumental music in 2021 https://u-one-music.com/joels-favorite-instrumental-music-in-2021/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 17:11:55 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/joels-favorite-instrumental-music-in-2021/ As I mentioned in my list of top albums, a true retrospective of the music I connected with in 2021 wouldn’t be complete without mentioning all the wordless records that have kept me company. Chances are, if I’m writing or editing (two tasks that take up most of the day), I’m listening to instrumental music. […]]]>

As I mentioned in my list of top albums, a true retrospective of the music I connected with in 2021 wouldn’t be complete without mentioning all the wordless records that have kept me company. Chances are, if I’m writing or editing (two tasks that take up most of the day), I’m listening to instrumental music. Most of the time I’m catching up, exploring the sounds of decades past, but it was the 2021 releases that literally got me through a rough year.

Jazzy

Even though this type of music isn’t usually your thing, you’ve probably heard of Promises, the album of the 81-year-old saxophonist Pharaoh Sanders and British producer floating point, with the assistance of the London Symphony Orchestra. Promises is a patient, rippling nine-movement piece filled with still moments, repetitive patterns, and great crescendos, all anchored by Sanders’ brilliant playing. Notes with attachments, another unlikely and rewarding collaboration, involves a 64-year-old session bassist Pino Palladino (the Who, D’Angelo) with producer and multi-instrumentalist Blake mills, including the 2020 album Mutable set was one of my favorites. Recorded at Sound City in LA in sessions spanning two years, each track on Attachments is a surprise, with West African, Cuban and funk influences anchoring the music. Nala Sinephro‘s Space 1.8 could easily fall into the ambient category, with Sinephro’s pedal harp and a bed of electronics giving the suite a feeling of flowing liquid, as if the band were making the Milky Way soundtrack.

Piano

I tend to be meditative when it comes to instrumental music, and the most extreme example would be Jacob David‘s Mursejler, which has become my go-to album for the Sunday nap, and I say that as a compliment to this Danish musician, who plays the hushed piano. The recording is done with a close mic so you can hear the way the hammers strike the felt on the strings (as well as the crackle of the piano bench), transforming the piano into a fascinating percussion instrument. Good headphones are essential for this one. Nils Frahm‘s Old friends new friends is in the same vein, a collection of minimalist pieces for solo piano in which we sometimes hear the pedals of the piano and even the breathing of Frahm.

Guitar

Guitar is the instrument I understand best, so it’s the genre that appeals to me the most. Big asterisk: I’ve listened to a lot of Powers / Rolin Duos, but more on that in the locals list coming next week. Yasmine williamsUrban driftwood blew my mind. Nothing looks like it. Watch her play and you’ll see why. With 10 pieces covering 24 minutes, Hotel Adeline‘s Good timing is a fairly simple yet solid acoustic guitar record. At the less traditional end of the spectrum, Chuck johnson evokes ambient drones from another world with its steel pedal on The ash grove, “a suite of requiems for lost places.” Multi-instrumentalist from Michigan Laurier promo explores new horizons for solo lap steel on Golden loam (a few voices). Hayden Pedigo native Amarillo, Texas released his best album to date, Let go (Mexican summer), and even ran for city council, which inspired the movie “Kid Candidate”. Excellent reliable guitarist Guillaume Tyler released two fantastic collaborative versions: Lost futures with the guitarist Marisa Anderson and the To understand EP with atmospheric steel pedal Luc Schneider. Another interesting collaboration: Cameron Knowler and Eli Winteris cranky and surprising Anticipation.

Ambient, experimental, etc.

Producer Jon hopkins is probably best known for his work with Coldplay and Purity Ring, but on Music for psychedelic therapy the musician combines slow, buzzing waves of synths with sounds from the natural world, including snippets of Hopkins’ time inside a cave in an Ecuadorian rainforest. In what appears to be a previously untapped vein, Walt mcclements uses his electronically processed accordion to create a new kind of ambient drone music. Earlier this month, Marie lattimore said to me, “The harp is my way of connecting with the world in this emotional way.” His music allowed me to do the same on Coins Collected 2015-2020, an unmissable release from an already impressive catalog.

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KCPS Instrumental Music Students Receive Honors from All Districts https://u-one-music.com/kcps-instrumental-music-students-receive-honors-from-all-districts/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 15:50:34 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/kcps-instrumental-music-students-receive-honors-from-all-districts/ Gregor White, eighth grade student at Foreign Language Academy, attended the All-District Middle School Jazz Band’s inaugural performance on Saturday, November 20 at the iconic Gem Theater. Gregor was featured in “Little Sunflower” by Freddie Hubbard and arranged by Mike Kamuf, which is a high school grade song. Principal Clarence Smith thanked the students and […]]]>
An eighth grade student dressed in black plays the saxophone on a stage lit with blue light.

Gregor White, eighth grade student at Foreign Language Academy, attended the All-District Middle School Jazz Band’s inaugural performance on Saturday, November 20 at the iconic Gem Theater. Gregor was featured in “Little Sunflower” by Freddie Hubbard and arranged by Mike Kamuf, which is a high school grade song. Principal Clarence Smith thanked the students and their families for persisting with instrumental music during a year of schooling during a pandemic.

KCPS instrumental music students have participated in the All-District Band, Jazz Band and Orchestra auditions at Liberty High School and Middle School. These students spent months preparing for the event, which was attended by hundreds of student musicians from as far north as Park Hill, south to Belton and as far east as Blue Springs.

We are proud to announce that the following students have been selected for honors from all districts.

From Lincoln College Preparatory Academy (directed by Jason Bata):

Music from the whole district 2021
Carmen Bata, Clarinet
Isaiah Van Dunk, Baritone saxophone, 1st alternate
Evan Martinez, Trombone, 2nd alternate
Nadia Alvarez, Euphonium, 1st substitute

2021 District Honorable Mention Group
Logan Stanley, Clarinet
Justice Christensen, Clarinet
Monique Fiagan, Bass clarinet
Isaiah Van Dunk, Baritone Saxophone
Evan Martinez, trombone
Nadia Alvarez, Euphonium
Albert Turner, tuba

Full District Orchestra 2021
Naomi Kriege, Violin
Sidney Richardson, Violin
Iris Church, Violin

Whole District Orchestra 2021
John Crow, violin
J Buch, Violin
Jaqueline Marquez, Violin
Eoin Harrison, Violin
Patience Christensen, viola, alternate

2021 Whole District Jazz Band
Carmen Bata, Tenor saxophone, substitute

From LCPA College (directed by Callie Garber):

2021 Whole District College Orchestra
Henry Crow, cello

From the Academy of Foreign Languages (directed by Susan Martinez):

2021 Whole District Middle School Honor Band
Olivia Smith, clarinet
Gregor White, Tenor Saxophone

2021 All-District Middle School Jazz Band
Gregor White, Tenor Saxophone

These students will perform from 6 p.m. on Saturday, December 11 at Liberty North High School. We are very proud of the achievements of these young musicians!

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The Pagosa Springs Instrumental Music Society to present a fall concert on Saturday https://u-one-music.com/the-pagosa-springs-instrumental-music-society-to-present-a-fall-concert-on-saturday/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/the-pagosa-springs-instrumental-music-society-to-present-a-fall-concert-on-saturday/ By Michelle ChapmanPagosa Springs Instrumental Music Society The Pagosa Springs Instrumental Music Society (PSIMS) will present their annual fall concert for free on Saturday, November 6 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Pagosa Springs High School. Donations will be gratefully accepted at the door before and after the concert. Our excellent local conductors and […]]]>

By Michelle Chapman
Pagosa Springs Instrumental Music Society

The Pagosa Springs Instrumental Music Society (PSIMS) will present their annual fall concert for free on Saturday, November 6 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Pagosa Springs High School.

Donations will be gratefully accepted at the door before and after the concert.

Our excellent local conductors and musicians perform for you free of charge. Our motivation is to raise funds and raise awareness to support local music education programs in our schools.

Pagosa Springs is fortunate to have music education programs in all of our public schools and in many of our private schools. Music education benefits us in many ways: brain development, math, language, physical coordination, rhythm, memory and more. Music opens doors for children.

Can you imagine what kind of life Bach or Mozart would have had if they hadn’t had music in their life? Or how different would our lives be without their beautiful music? It’s the world upside down.

Music is priceless, but providing quality music education costs money. For example, the cost of purchasing music for the high school program can reach $ 2,000 per year. Instrument repairs per year range from $ 3,000 to $ 4,000, depending on the instruments. Occasionally, large percussion elements need to be replaced. Have you recently evaluated the price of a new marimba ($ 6,000)? Supplies should be kept on hand in case a student needs them at school. The expenses add up.

PSIMS provides funds to bridge the gap between what the school can provide and what would be best for the music education of our children. Our vision is “Music for Life”. Music education is one way to ensure that there will be generations of musicians in Pagosa Springs in the future. We believe that music adds to the quality of life for the whole community.

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RM Rock & Metal Club Brings New Approach to Instrumental Music – The Tide https://u-one-music.com/rm-rock-metal-club-brings-new-approach-to-instrumental-music-the-tide/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/rm-rock-metal-club-brings-new-approach-to-instrumental-music-the-tide/ Guitar strummings hum through the music hall during Thursday lunches, inviting curious ears to discover its source. The sounds come from Room 109, where students come together to share their unique musical passions at one of RM’s newest clubs this year: the RM RM club. This particularly catchy name is the abbreviation for the Richard […]]]>

Guitar strummings hum through the music hall during Thursday lunches, inviting curious ears to discover its source. The sounds come from Room 109, where students come together to share their unique musical passions at one of RM’s newest clubs this year: the RM RM club. This particularly catchy name is the abbreviation for the Richard Montgomery Rock & Metal club, which aims to provide a comfortable space for its fans to play and enjoy music with each other.

Earlier this year, seniors Patrick Kim and Jeffrey Vedrin took to the music rooms over lunch to play guitar and learn new pieces together. These meetings quickly turned into a club as they received a growing appreciation and interest in their music.

“I realized that I had to start a club when I realized that a lot of people wanted to learn guitar with me. I also wanted to share Polyphia’s greatness, ”Kim said.

For those who may not be familiar with them, Polyphia is a rock band known for their progressive instrumental music. Its genre is often referred to as math rock, due to its complexity.

“I think Polyphia’s technical ability is really amazing… she pushes the boundaries of instrumental music. Tim Henson (the lead guitarist) has a unique way of combining different techniques to create great music, and I think he influences a lot of guitarists like me.

While Kim and Vedrin are both dedicated to the group and aim to expand its influence, the club is far from exclusive to Polyphia fans or expert guitarists.

“We have a pretty diverse group: from freshmen to seniors, beginners to experts, and we’re constantly learning from each other,” Vedrin said. He is himself an amateur guitarist and new fan of Polyphia, responsible for the “rock” part of the club but also exploring his musical passions like most of the members.

“At our meetings, we discuss songs and artists that we love, and I try to teach members how to play their favorite songs,” Kim said.

Since the club’s inception, many students have taken advantage of this collaborative space to relax over lunch while learning something new. Senior Zach Lidl joined the club to play guitar with others, also giving mini-performances to his friends.

“I would recommend it to friends because it’s a great fun club and I’m able to interact with other guitarists and just hang out,” Lidl said.

As the lack of time and the high cost of music lessons are often obstacles to the pursuit of an instrument, an additional goal of the founders is to alleviate these challenges for the students.

“Since people often don’t have a place in their schedules to take guitar lessons, there is [the club] gives them a good opportunity to try to learn, ”Vedrin said.

“Overall, I just want everyone to have fun and progress, building on each other.”

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Palm Beach Symphony opens nominations for Instrumental Music Teacher of the Year https://u-one-music.com/palm-beach-symphony-opens-nominations-for-instrumental-music-teacher-of-the-year/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/palm-beach-symphony-opens-nominations-for-instrumental-music-teacher-of-the-year/ Students, parents, colleagues and community members are invited to nominate local instrumental music teachers for the title of Palm Beach Symphony Instrumental Music Teacher of the Year. The deadline for nominations that can be made online is 5 p.m. on Monday, November 1. “Victor Fernandez, who teaches at Beacon Cove Intermediate, was honored last year […]]]>

Students, parents, colleagues and community members are invited to nominate local instrumental music teachers for the title of Palm Beach Symphony Instrumental Music Teacher of the Year. The deadline for nominations that can be made online is 5 p.m. on Monday, November 1.

“Victor Fernandez, who teaches at Beacon Cove Intermediate, was honored last year and, as he also teaches my son, I personally understand the enormous contributions music teachers make to the education and life of a youngster, ”said Palm Beach Symphony CEO David H. McClymont. “This pandemic has put a strain on students’ academic performance and personal relationships. Music has been shown to alleviate some of this stress, and we have never been so grateful or proud of the amazing instrumental music teachers of our community. “

The recognition comes with many educational opportunities for award-winning students, including coaching sessions by Palm Beach Symphony musicians for spring semester music students, a classroom visit by Symphony Music Director Gerard Schwarz, tickets Free for winner’s classes to attend a Palm Beach Symphony concert and the opportunity for a student musical ensemble of the winner’s choice to perform at a Palm Beach Symphony event. The Instrumental Music Teacher of the Year will also benefit from an “Indulgences Basket” filled with gift items and gift certificates.

Applications are open for Kindergarten to Grade 12 educators in Palm Beach County public, private, and charter schools with a minimum of three years of experience. The annual award honors educators who demonstrate an ability to teach and inspire students as well as who play an active role in the community as performing arts educators. Submissions that meet all of the eligibility requirements will be reviewed by a panel of judges including musicians, industry professionals, and other Palm Beach County educators.

The award will be presented at the fifth annual Holly Jolly Symphony Party on Tuesday, December 7 at the Beach Club in Palm Beach. The event will also include a performance by the students of the King’s Academy Choir and the presentation of instruments to the students. Last season, the Symphony donated instruments worth over $ 96,000 if purchased by students or local music programs.

Full details and nomination form are available in the Programs tab under Music Education to Instrumental Music Teacher of the Year | Palm Beach Symphony.

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Real-time AI can generate lines for live instrumental music https://u-one-music.com/real-time-ai-can-generate-lines-for-live-instrumental-music/ Fri, 13 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/real-time-ai-can-generate-lines-for-live-instrumental-music/ Researchers at the University of Waterloo’s Natural Language Processing Lab have developed a real-time artificial intelligence (AI) system that can generate lines for live instrumental music. The new system is called LyricJam, and it went live in June 2021 with over 1,500 users testing it since then. The team will present its research at the […]]]>

Researchers at the University of Waterloo’s Natural Language Processing Lab have developed a real-time artificial intelligence (AI) system that can generate lines for live instrumental music. The new system is called LyricJam, and it went live in June 2021 with over 1,500 users testing it since then.

The team will present its research at the International Conference on Computational Creativity in September.

The lab is headed by Olga Vechtomova, an engineering professor who was jointly appointed in computer science at the university. Vechtomova has been developing AI applications for years, and the lab’s work first led to the creation of a system that learns artists’ musical expressions before generating lyrics in their style.

Vechtomova and Waterloo graduate students Gaurav Sahu and Dhruv Kumas have also developed technology that uses different musical components such as chord progressions, tempo, and instrumentation. The technology is able to synthesize the lyrics to reflect the mood and emotions expressed by live music.

The neural network

The system continuously receives raw audio clips while a musician or group performs instrumental music. After that, the neural network processes the data before generating new lyrics, which artists can then use to develop lyrics for their songs.

“The purpose of the system is not to write a song for the artist,” explains Vechtomova. “Instead, we want to help artists realize their own creativity. The system generates poetic lines with new metaphors and expressions, potentially leading artists in creative directions they have never explored before.

The newly developed neural network is able to learn what lyrical themes and words are associated with different aspects of music, and most impressively, it does so in every audio clip.

The team performed a user study in which musicians performed live music while using the system.

“An unexpected finding is that the participants felt encouraged by the lines generated to improvise,” Vechtomova said. “For example, the lines have inspired the artists to structure the chords a little differently and to take their improvisation in a new direction than initially intended. Some musicians also used the lines to check if their improvisation was having the desired emotional effect.

Partnership with AI

Another major aspect of this research was its demonstration of collaboration and co-creativity between humans and AI. According to participants, the system acted as a musical partner, not a critical one, which allowed musicians to play unhindered. They also said they felt encouraged to play musical instruments even though they were not working on the lyrics.

The new LyricJam system is the latest example of how artificial intelligence is making its way into our creative minds. While we always talk about the connection between humans and AI, it is often in terms of areas like health. With new advancements like these, we’re also getting closer to being connected to these machines in creative ways.

The LyricJam system can be found here.

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Joy as an instrumental music charge will be phased out in West Lothian for next year https://u-one-music.com/joy-as-an-instrumental-music-charge-will-be-phased-out-in-west-lothian-for-next-year/ Fri, 30 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/joy-as-an-instrumental-music-charge-will-be-phased-out-in-west-lothian-for-next-year/ The news that young people learning to play an instrument in West Lothian won’t have to pay fees is music to their families’ ears. Funding worth £ 7million from the Scottish Government will cover the costs for the 2021-2022 academic year. And one mom who was thrilled to hear the news was Hazel Ross, whose […]]]>

The news that young people learning to play an instrument in West Lothian won’t have to pay fees is music to their families’ ears.

Funding worth £ 7million from the Scottish Government will cover the costs for the 2021-2022 academic year.

And one mom who was thrilled to hear the news was Hazel Ross, whose daughter Isla plays the French horn.

Hazel had spoken to the Courier in the past about being billed full price for her children’s music lessons when all they can learn is theory, without practice, due to covid rules.

She said: ‘It is of course great news that the government has come to their senses in providing funding to allow for the removal of these unfair fees ensuring free instrumental music lessons in Scottish public schools.

“Job security will be a relief for the guardian and families will also appreciate the financial burden lightened during this pandemic.

“I am delighted that so many other children can once again access and benefit from the service. “

Breaking the news, MSP Fiona Hyslop brushed off the work of the West Lothian council, accusing the party of bringing the charges in the first place, something party leader and council head Lawrence Fitzpatrick said they had was imposed because of the SNP. cuts.

She said: “Learning to music can be life changing for many young people and West Lothian has always had a great tradition of making music in the county. It is essential that all young people who receive additional music lessons in schools can do so because of their talent and love of music and are not limited by costs.

“Instrumental music lessons are of utmost importance to children and young people in West Lothian, and I am glad that funding has been introduced to remove the fees originally introduced by the West Lothian Labor Council.

“I fought for this pledge to be included in the SNP’s manifesto for the 2021 Scottish parliamentary elections, and I am delighted that the Scottish government has put in place funding to ensure access to education for all young people. musical.

“I know that members of the Scottish Youth Parliament have fought for this, including our local MSP in Linlithgow, Alice Ferguson, who even testified before the Scottish Parliament on the issue. Their hard work has paid off and now local families in West Lothian will pay no fees for music lessons. “

Lawrence Fitzpatrick said he also welcomed the news, but said it was “dishonest” for Fiona Hyslop to attack the West Lothian Council for introducing fees for instrumental music services in 2018, which ‘he said he was forced to make by the SNP cuts.

He continued: ‘Between 2007 and 2023 West Lothian Council will be forced to realize budget savings of over £ 151million in the provision of services due to prolonged constraints in Scottish government funding.

“The reasons why most boards, like ourselves, introduced a fee for the IMS was that the IMS was not a statutory service and the savings were needed to continue providing essential services to the most. vulnerable in our county.

“It was a heartbreaking decision to introduce pricing, but with massive budget pressures, there was no alternative.

“It is true that SNP-led councils across Scotland have introduced fees for IMS, their fees are higher than those in West Lothian.

“We are therefore delighted that the Scottish Government has accepted this position three years late.”

Don’t miss thelatest news from the West Lothian Courier. Sign up for our free newsletter herehttps://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/newsletter-preference-centre

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Brian Lin – Orange County Register https://u-one-music.com/brian-lin-orange-county-register/ Sun, 02 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/brian-lin-orange-county-register/ Brian Lin wants to double major in neuroscience and music in college, so he can marry his love for music with its effects on the brain to “promote the use of music therapy to become an important form of treatment of mental health and rehabilitation “. The senior’s musical portfolio from the Orange County School […]]]>

Brian Lin wants to double major in neuroscience and music in college, so he can marry his love for music with its effects on the brain to “promote the use of music therapy to become an important form of treatment of mental health and rehabilitation “.

The senior’s musical portfolio from the Orange County School of the Arts was therapy for judges’ ears as Lin took home the honors of instrumental artist of the year.

The judges universally praised Lin’s tone, phrasing, and inflections. Even its “sense of color and form,” in the words of Judge Tom Mueller, associate professor of music at Concordia University.

Brian Lin, senior at the Orange County School of the Arts, is the Artist of the Year in Instrumental Music, is shown at the Casa Romantica Culture and Gardens Center in San Clemente on Sunday, April 18, 2021. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register / SCNG)

Lin specializes in the classical saxophone, an “underused medium,” according to Judge Daniel deArakal, a professor at Chapman University.

See all semi-finalists for instrumental music

Shawne Zarubica, director of the Pacific Symphony Youth Ensemble, said Lin “can be a true pioneer in giving the saxophone increased prominence in the classical music arena.”

Robert Frelly, Music Director of Chapman University, wrote in his comments: “His desire to study the links between music and the brain is both intriguing and timely.

Lin said that the saxophone, which he bought six or seven years ago, was a hidden and overlooked gem in classical music. He hopes to raise it one day to “compete with the violin and the piano”.

One of the performances from the portfolio chosen by Lin was the Sonata “Tres Modere, expressif” in C sharp for alto saxophone.

According to Lin, the piece by composer Fernande Decruckas “was largely forgotten until the turn of the 21st century. Since then it has been part of the repertoire of most classical saxophonists.

See all nominees for instrumental music

Lin said music was a lifelong pursuit, writing in his statement, “I remember my parents showing me a video of me randomly conducting Beethoven symphonies when I was very little.”

The pandemic had a silver lining for Lin in that, through increased use of digital communication, he had better access to a wider range of music teachers and instrumentalists. These experiences, he said, “transformed my playing” and “broadened my tonal palette and the way I interpret music.”

For the past two years, Lin has been a prominent musician with the OCSA wind and jazz ensembles after being transferred from Chino Hills High. In 2020, he won the Senior Winds category in the Music Teacher National Association competition for California. He was also named the replacement for the only chair attributed to the alto saxophone with the 2020 National Youth Orchestra 2 at Carnegie Hall.

Instrumental Music Finalists

Instrumental music is divided into four specialties: jazz, piano and strings, wind and percussion, and world / cultural and commercial music. Artist of the Year Brian Lin is the finalist in Wind and Percussion.

The other finalists are:

Jazz: Christian P. Perez, Lycée de Valence

Christian P. Perez de Placentia, a final year student at the Lycée de Valence, is the finalist in instrumental music in the jazz specialty for Artist of the Year in 2021. (Photo courtesy of Anadelia Jaramillo)

The last time Christian P. Perez played saxophone for his father was on Zoom as his father died of COVID-19. The high school student from Valence brought this same feeling of intimacy and “to go beyond notes and rhythm”, to win the jazz specialty.

For his portfolio, Perez played a trio of songs that he said “present three very different but equally beautiful parts of jazz history”: Julian’s rendition of “Cannonball” Adderly of “On Green Dolphin Street” , “You Stepped Out of a Dream” by Dexter Gordon, “and” I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues “by Seamus Blake.

Piano and strings: Sarah Liu, Lutheran Lutheran Crean High School

Sarah Liu of Yorba Linda, a student at Crean Lutheran High School, is a finalist in Instrumental Music in the Piano and Strings Specialty for Artist of the Year in 2021. (Photo courtesy of Anyi Liu)

A life surrounded by music and chasing after Danielle, her older violinist sister, helped prepare Sarah Liu, senior at Crean Lutheran High School, to be recognized as the Piano and String Artist of the Year. The Liu sisters have teamed up for countless performances in Orange County, including touring with the Pacfic Symphony. However, Sarah Liu has sculpted her unique space with magnificent interpretations of “The Lark Ascending” by Vaughan Williams and Mozart’s Concerto No.5.

World / cultural and commercial music: Meg Jillian Salanga, Mater Dei High School

Meg Jillian Salanga of Buena Park, a final year student at Mater Dei High School, is the instrumental music semi-finalist in the world / cultural and commercial music specialty for Artist of the Year in 2021. (Photo courtesy of Taylor Smith)

With some original songs, “Mare” and “Love Precision”, and a light version of “City of Stars”, from guitarist, singer / songwriter of “La La Land” Meg Jillian Salanga, senior at Mater Dei High, has been selected Artist of the year in world, cultural and commercial music. Salanga supported her voice on electric, acoustic and bass guitars, including some awesome riffs and rock in “Mare”.

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Closing of instrumental music – Santa Barbara News-Press https://u-one-music.com/closing-of-instrumental-music-santa-barbara-news-press/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://u-one-music.com/closing-of-instrumental-music-santa-barbara-news-press/ State Street monument closes to locals and music makers RAFAEL MALDONADO / PHOTOS INFO-PRESSInstrumental Music will close its Santa Barbara site in April. The store, whose walls are lined with guitars and ukuleles, will hold a final sale on April 10 to clear its inventory. After 25 years of activity, Instrumental Music in Santa Barbara […]]]>

State Street monument closes to locals and music makers

RAFAEL MALDONADO / PHOTOS INFO-PRESS
Instrumental Music will close its Santa Barbara site in April. The store, whose walls are lined with guitars and ukuleles, will hold a final sale on April 10 to clear its inventory.

After 25 years of activity, Instrumental Music in Santa Barbara is retiring and moving forward with its plan to close in April.

With guitars and ukuleles lining the walls, the store has established itself as a State Street landmark over the years and struck a chord with locals literally and figuratively.

Despite the company’s loyal customer base, rising operating costs, increased consumer shopping online and the COVID-19 pandemic are all factors in the location’s closure, said Bryan McCann , owner and founder of the company, to News-Press Tuesday.

“It’s a regret to leave, but since our founding in 1979 we’ve made a lot of adjustments to changes in the market… The best way for us to maintain instrumental music is to consolidate locations and focus on offering. of a more meaningful experience. for the guitar buyer at our Thousand Oaks site, ”said McCann.

A “For Sale” sign hangs outside Instrumental Music on Upper State Street as the company plans to consolidate its inventory into one location in Thousand Oaks.

The State Street closure comes just a year after the company closed its Ventura site in January 2020. With only one store remaining, Instrumental Music will now showcase all of its inventory at the Thousand Oaks site with plans to expand its presence in line of business in the coming months.

For Dominic Pino, senior sales staff at the music store, closing the doors is a huge loss.

Even before joining the instrumental music team nearly ten years ago, Mr. Pino remembers spending his teenage years in the boutique and meeting the members of his first band.

“To me, I just feel a little bad for the musicians in Santa Barbara County just because it’s like one of the last real, visceral, physical music stores where you can come in and sit and play music. guitar and potentially meet other musicians, ”Pino told the State Street Store News-Press. “I mean, how I found my first band (was) walking into a music store and sitting down and just meeting kids.”

In addition to guitars and ukuleles, Instrumental Music has keyboards for sale until the store closes in February.

As a full-time staff member at the Thousand Oaks site, Mr. Pino will not lose his job, but instead he is saddened by the loss of opportunities for aspiring musicians in Santa Barbara.

“You can be a person on the street, but when you walk into a music store, you are a musician, and all of a sudden, you are someone,” Mr. Pino said. “That sort of thing is really hard to come by in an online experience. So for me I feel a kind of sense of loss for the people and the musicians in Santa Barbara because there is a certain experience that comes with being able to walk into a music store and play and talk and really be around people. sharing the same ideas. “

Since the announcement of the decision to close the State Street store, Mr. McCann and Mr. Pino have received numerous messages and farewells from loyal customers.

“We have received a tremendous amount of feedback from our long-time customers in the community,” said Mr. McCann. “Buying a musical instrument is a very unique experience because it is one of the few items that you could potentially have for the rest of your life… In the 25 years that we have been (in Santa Barbara), we’ve had people contacting bought their first guitar from us, and they still know what the case felt like and they still play that guitar.

Dominic Pino, a member of the senior sales team, said he was saddened to see the Santa Barbara site close. “To me, I just feel a little bad for the musicians in Santa Barbara County just because it’s like one of the last real, visceral, physical music stores where you can come in and sit and play music. guitar and potentially meet other musicians. “

Many loyal customers are mourning the loss of one of the city’s last remaining music stores, Pino said. He hopes, however, that they will make the trip to Thousand Oaks to continue visiting instrumental music in person.

“It’s not like instrumental music is going to go away,” Pino said. “I mean, the idea is to consolidate at Thousand Oaks and come back stronger than ever. But removing this physical presence from the Santa Barbara community has implications, especially for young musicians. “

The instrumental music plans to close to the public on April 3, but will reopen for a booming final sale at its 3328 State Street location on April 10.

For details, call the store at 805-569-5055.

e-mail: mhirneisen@newspress.com

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